They’re Still Kids

Last night while I worked the booth at our football game and we played against an inferior team, a parent said to me “how can they be playing so badly?”

I replied, “They’re kids.”

norman-rockwell--fumble-or-tackled-november-21-1925_i-G-52-5270-BNPZG00Z

Yes, our team is more athletic, better coached (I’d argue), and more practiced, but a high school football team is made up of 14-18 year-old kids. If you’ve ever worked with teens, you know that even the most intelligent students can be emotional, rash, and mistake-prone. They are not perfect. They err. If they were perfect, they wouldn’t need to be in school.

If you’ve ever coached high school football, you also know that anything can happen in a high school game, especially the first game of the season when the kids get their first taste of hitting an opponent instead of their teammates. The kids can be overly driven by emotion, feel overconfident, revert to bad habits that you’ve worked on in practice, and more.

This is just like the classroom. I have taught my students how to use advanced skills when writing their essays, provided feedback, sat one-on-one with kids, and given multiple practices and then watched my students ignore all of that teaching, coaching, and practicing when writing the very next essay. We then have to go back to those previous skills–the ones they already showed me they could perform–and remind, re-teach, and review.

Sometimes kids are just kids.

Image

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s