20% Increase

Last year I made vocabulary a focus in my English classroom, beyond the simple literary terms upon which we English teachers focus. I decided I was tired of 65% averages on quizzes. I figured I must be doing something wrong, so I used my Masters classes as a way to better my teaching (fancy that!). I even told the kids they were part of a study, which they enjoyed.

Here’s what I do now.

Mondays (40 minutes)
1. The previous week’s practice work turned in (puzzle and charts)
2. A vocabulary quiz over the previous week’s words
3. A crossword puzzle with the new words (and the old ones)
4. A chart where students create sentences for the each new word
5. A chart where the students draw a picture for each new word

Wednesdays (15 minutes)
1. 3-5 students write their sentences and pictures on the board (each student gets a different word)

Thursdays (15 minutes)
1. 3-5 students write their sentences and pictures on the board (each student gets a different word)

Fridays (10 minutes)
1. Students brainstorm synonyms for the words
2. Synonyms listed on the board

Lastly, I have the students spell the words, match them to definitions, fill in blanks in sentences, compose sentences or stories, share their pictures and explain how they are appropriate, and more. I have some of the traditional quizzes, but I also try to mix it up a bit and the kids seem to appreciate it.

We get to practice the words, talk about them, connect them to images, apply new words to situations, and generally share ideas. It’s great!

They also like the routine we’ve created because they see their immediate successes. Now averages range from 85-90% on the quizzes.

8 thoughts on “20% Increase

  1. Mrs. Chili

    Wowie. Can’t argue with THOSE numbers!

    I need to figure out how to teach vocabulary to my community college students – I find their communication skills are severely hampered by their limited word choices…

    Reply
  2. DrPezz

    I will check the book out. Thanks!

    I do use some of the word sorts for certain sections of our vocabulary lists. Still, I could probably do a better job.

    Reply
  3. Pingback: Teaching Vocabulary « The Doc Is In

  4. Pingback: Teaching Vocabulary « The Doc Is In

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s