Poems for Teaching Denotation & Connotation

When teaching denotation and connotation I use numerous poems in addition to the literature we are reading (The Crucible‘s use of “cold” is an excellent example if you are reading it, which we just were). Here are three I use with my classes:

Alfred, Lord Tennyson’s “The Eagle” (also great for alliteration)

He clasps the crag with crooked hands;
Close to the sun in lonely lands,
Ringed with the azure world, he stands.

The wrinkled sea beneath him crawls;
He watches from his mountain walls,
And like a thunderbolt he falls.

Emily Dickinson’s “There is no frigate like a book”

There is no frigate like a book
To take us lands away,
Nor any coursers like a page
Of prancing poetry.
This traverse may the poorest take
Without oppress of toll;
How frugal is the chariot
That bears a human soul!

Theodore Roethke’s “My Papa’s Waltz”

The whiskey on your breath
Could make a small boy dizzy;
But I hung on like death:
Such waltzing was not easy.

We romped until the pans
Slid from the kitchen shelf;
My mother’s countenance
Could not unfrown itself.

The hand that held my wrist
Was battered on one knuckle;
At every step you missed
My right ear scraped a buckle.

You beat time on my head
With a palm caked hard by dirt,
Then waltzed me off to bed
Still clinging to your shirt.

About these ads

5 thoughts on “Poems for Teaching Denotation & Connotation

  1. Pingback: Global SMT & Packaging magazine for electronics assembly and advanced packaging professionals.

  2. Pingback: Paginas Web Tijuana

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s